caralockhartsmith

stories and illustration

Heron, Willow, Leet Water

heron

They have almost a sixth sense, herons; I just caught sight of this one through the branches of the willow, as I was crossing the green to walk under the bridge. It cottoned on to my presence almost as soon as I had taken the photograph, even though I was quite a distance away.  I continued through the ever-thickening undergrowth in the area beyond the bridge, where hardly anyone walks.  Caught sight of the heron again, but once more the bird had spotted me and was off.  I think it was quite irritated by my encroaching on its territory because it flew above my head, looking a touch pterodactylish, screeching. Last time I walked down by the weir on the Leet I saw two yellow wagtails, they weren’t at all disturbed by my presence; unfortunately I didn’t have my camera, as I would like to have recorded them, as I haven’t seen any for years. The swallows are back, and the house martins, and there is a whole host of sand martins down on the Tweed, they are little beserkers when it is sunny and there are insects about.

May 7, 2014 - Posted by | Photography, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , ,

8 Comments »

  1. I always love seeing the herons, but you are so right about that third eye….I usually blame the dogs for alerting them 🙂

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    Comment by greenmackenzie | May 7, 2014 | Reply

    • Yes, they are canny birds. They always seem to own wherever they decide to be. So many of them on the Tweed, and on that particular part of the Leet, but they are difficult to get near. I once stood very close to one on the edge of the lake at the Hirsel, it was standing under a willow as if frozen, but unfortunately that was before I went around with a camera on me. Good to hear from you, Seonaid.

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      Comment by Cara Lockhart Smith | May 8, 2014 | Reply

  2. I really like this photo. Plenty of landscape which allows me to experience the place and create an experience similar to see a heron myself.

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    Comment by Mike Bizeau | May 7, 2014 | Reply

    • Thanks, Mike. It was luck that I just came across the green and saw the heron, I didn’t have time to compose the shot. I tried cropping it, but in the end preferred to just leave it as it was, as a record of that particular moment, treetrunk and all…. it appealed to me that the heron was just by the little weir so the fall of the water was part of the shot.

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      Comment by Cara Lockhart Smith | May 8, 2014 | Reply

      • Cara, the shot works just as it is and your decisions in editing made it brilliant. hope your day is going great.

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        Comment by Mike Bizeau | May 8, 2014

  3. Fantastic – love how the Heron is so stoic and graceful in its search for dinner.

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    Comment by Mary | May 8, 2014 | Reply

  4. I lived next to this heron’s parents- or perhaps grandparents- as a child. Lees Farm House was my home and I would climb my wall, wander through the woods and quietly try my luck at heron-spotting. This picture brings back many fond memories.

    Rachel

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    Comment by Rachel Burns | May 12, 2014 | Reply

    • What a lovely comment, Rachel. And how much you must have enjoyed those wanderings when you were a child. My son was bought up for the first few years of his life in a very remote spot in the Liddel Valley, where he had the same freedom to roam. It gave him something very precious.

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      Comment by Cara Lockhart Smith | May 14, 2014 | Reply


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